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Showing posts from March, 2010

Surname Saturday

Poundstone: Literal translation of German Pfundstein, probably a metonymic occupational name for a weighing official or a merchant who used stones as weights (definition from http://genealogy.familyeducation.com/surname-origin/poundstone)


My  Poundstone line begins with my paternal grandmother, Ruby Pearl Poundstone.  She was born in Cerro Gordo, Piatt, Illinois.  Her father, Ora Pearl Poundstone, was born in Young America, Cass, Indiana and died in Bement, Piatt, Illinois.  Ora's father, Richard Poundstone born in 1838 in Bowling Greene, Licking, Ohio and died in Bement, Piatt, Illinois.  Richard's father, John Nicholas Poundstone, was born in Fayette County, Pennsylvania and died in Young America, Cass, Indiana.John N. Poundstone's father, Phillip Poundstone began life in Pennsylvania and died in Licking County, Ohio.  Richard Poundstone, born in 1724 in Germany is the earliest known Poundstone in my line.  He died and raised his family in Pennsylvania.  My line is fairly…

Wordless Wednesday

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Tombstone Tuesday

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This is the headstone of Elizabeth Poundstone Hyman (my 2nd Great-Grandaunt) and her husband Lewis Hyman.  There are buried at the Center United Brethren Church Cemetery, in Deer Creek, Cass County, Indiana.  My 2nd Great-Grandfather, Richard Poundstone, was the only sibling of Elizabeth's to leave Cass County, Indiana.  Henry, George, Caroline (Zeck), Phillip, Elizabeth (Hyman) and Delilah all remained in the area.

Wordless Wednesday - Lorraine Skibbe (Mom) 1939

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Tombstone Tuesday

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Great Aunt Ann and Great Uncle Edward Skibbe.  They married when Ed was 41 and Anne 46.  They had no children.  They are buried in the Oak Hill Cemetery in Plymouth, Marshall, Indiana.

Treasure Chest Thursday

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Great Grandfather's original naturalization paper and court entry dated July 17, 1894.

Wordless Wednesday- Mother, Lorraine Skibbe age 3

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Treasure Chest Thursday

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Sweetheart pillow cover from World War I brought back from France by William Adolph Skibbe.

Wordless Wednesday

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