Saturday Night Genealogy Fun -- The Wayback Machine


Saturday Night Genealogy Fun -- 

The Wayback Machine

Calling all Genea-Musings Fans: 


 It's Saturday Night again - 
time for some more Genealogy Fun!!

Join in the fun with Randy Seaver's Saturday Night Prompt for Saturday Night Fun
Original post at http://www.geneamusings.com/2015/08/saturday-night-genealogy-fun-wayback.html 

1)  Do you have a website or a blog?  Or know someone with one?  Pick yours, or theirs or another.

2)  Now go to the Wayback Machine (https://web.archive.org/web/) and put the web site address in the search field.  

3)  Share your Wayback adventure with us in your own blog post, in a Facebook or google+ post.  Be sure to leave a link in a Comment on this blog.

Here's mine:
The Wayback Machine starts for The Genealogy Search on 11 January 2012.  Here are four of my posts from that period of history: 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 11, 2012


Wordless Wednesday - Yurmanovich/Urman Family

June 1934 Milwaukee, Wisconsin - Frank, Bob, and Ivana (Eva) Yurmanovich last name later changed to Urman

SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012


National Archives - Genealogy Lectures YouTube Videos


National Archives Press Release January 4, 2012
For the first time, the National Archives has launched online videos of its most popular genealogy “how to” workshops. These videos cover “hot topics” in genealogical research such as census, immigration and military records. Now, these popular workshops led by National Archives experts are available on the National Archives YouTube channel [www.youtube.com/user/usnationalarchives].
The National Archives-produced Know Your Records video shorts cover the creation, scope, content, and use of National Archives records for genealogical research. "The National Archives is proud to make our most popular genealogy lectures available online and ready for viewing by anyone, anywhere, at any time," said Diane Dimkoff, Director of Customer Services.
Genealogy Introduction: Military Research at the National Archives: Volunteer Service (8:22) [www.youtube.com/watch?v=2zgKBrsVpxY]
Archives specialist John Deeben discusses compiled military service records at the National Archives.
Genealogy Introduction—Military Research at the National Archives: Regular Service (6:11) [www.youtube.com/watch?v=1OMO-PbmMEw]
Archives Specialist John Deeben explains how to use Army and Navy registers of enlistment and rendezvous reports for research.
Genealogy Introduction—Military Research at the National Archives: Pension Records (9:04)
[www.youtube.com/watch?v=oT-AgYFhX1k]
Archives Specialist John Deeben discusses how to research military service using pension records dating from 1775 to 1916. Deeben shows samples of both Revolutionary War and Civil War pensions.
Genealogy Introduction—Immigration Records at the National Archives (11:57)
[www.youtube.com/watch?v=OCZTSrSvxyc]
Archives Specialists Katherine Vollen and Rebecca Crawford provide an overview of immigration records from 1800 to 1957, including Customs Service and Immigration and Naturalization records, as well as records of ports and border crossings.
Genealogy Introduction: Census Records at the National Archives (11:57)
[www.youtube.com/watch?v=yl54NX_H1ko]
Genealogy expert Constance Potter shares tips and strategies for researching U.S. Federal Census Records 1790 to 1930, and explains how they can be used for genealogical research.

Background on “Know Your Records” programs

The National Archives holds the permanently valuable records of the Federal government. These include records of interest to genealogists, such as pension files, ship passenger lists, census and Freedmen’s Bureau materials. The Know Your Records Program offers opportunities for staff, volunteers, and researchers to learn about these records through lectures, ongoing genealogy programs, workshops, symposia, the Annual Genealogy Fair, an online genealogy tutorialreference reports for genealogical research, and editions of Researcher News for Washington DC area researchers.


FRIDAY, JANUARY 6, 2012


Archaic Medical Terms in genealogy

I blogged the other day about my Great-grandparents Wilhelm and Julia Skibbe.  Julia died of Bright's disease with a contributory factor of arsenic poisoning. Why would she be given arsenic?  In the early 1900's arsenic was used for numerous ailments.  Among them were sexual diseases, acne, malaria, and headaches.  Interestingly, my family has a documented history of migraines.

A great place to find out more about those old medical terms is Rudy's List of Archaic Medical Terms.  You can also check out Genproxy,  and Old Names for Illness and Causes of Death for more information.  A good book to have as reference is A Medical Miscellany for Genealogists by Dr. Jeanette L. Gerger.  The book is available used for around $14 or new for about $22.   Take your research a step further by doing a little research into the cause of death.  You never know you may uncover some interesting details or a genetic malady in your family.


THURSDAY, JANUARY 5, 2012


Blogger of Honor - Mesa Family History Expo

I am very proud to announce that I have been selected as a Blogger of Honor for the Mesa Family History Expo in Mesa, Arizona on January 20-21.  There is still time to make plans to attend this event.  Visit the Mesa Family History Expo web page for registration information.  The event kicks off with keynote speaker Arlene H. Eakle, Ph.D., President and founder of The Genealogical Institute, Inc.  Arlene has over thirty years experience and is a wonderful speaker.  I hope you have the chance to sit in on one of her presentations during the expo.

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